Suits don’t represent authority: South Korean women’s dress leads to controversy at the meeting (photo)

On August 6, according to South Korean media reports, South Korea’s parliament law does not regulate the dress of members of the national assembly. But recently, a 27 year old female member of the Justice Party of South Korea, Liu haozhen, dressed in a red dress, caused public opinion controversy. < p > < p > some netizens commented on Liu haozhen’s dress, saying, “we should separate the scene and the opportunity”, and even some netizens made a speech with sexual harassment. But at the same time, some netizens praised it, “we need more Liu haozhen.”. On August 6, Liu haozhen, who participated in a radio program, said she did not expect to cause controversy. She was also surprised. She also said she wanted to break the conventions of black, dark and tie. No matter what kind of clothes they wear, she added, there will always be criticism of the dress of female politicians, often accompanied by sexual harassment such as “what a formal dress you are.”. In response to the accusation of “no etiquette”, Liu haozhen said she did not think that the prestige of the Congress was based on suits. The so-called convention also needs to change with the changes of the times. “I think I go to work in clothes that will allow me to do my job well,” she said According to reports, no member of Parliament formally raised an objection to Liu haozhen’s dress on that day. In addition, South Korea’s parliament law does not regulate the dress of members of the national assembly. In fact, this is not the first time that members of Congress have been controversial about their clothes. Earlier, South Korea’s open-door Councilor Liu Shimin once wore white trousers and casual clothes to attend the Congress meeting, triggering a “white pants storm.”.